The year of gardening poorly.

The garden is a great place to learn the permaculture principal of “Apply Self Regulation and Accept Feedback” as espoused by permaculturist and co-founder of the concept, David Holmgren in his book Permaculture: Principles and Pathways Beyond Sustainability. I had to learn that lesson this year. For the past few growing seasons I have maintained four garden plots at a local community garden here in Lancaster, PA. This year I signed up for the same number of plots so that I would have ample space to grow all the wonderful vegetables and flowers that I could possibly want. Each plot is 200 square feet so I had 800 square feet of growing space to work with. I felt like that was completely manageable even if my wife was less involved than in years past due to her new job. Life however has a way of changing our plans as well as our thinking.

This spring my wife Christina and I began the process of buying our first home. The process went smoothly and our realtor, Tami Shaub of Hostetter Realty in Lancaster County, PA, was absolutely fantastic. Christina and I knew nothing about buying a house and Tami walked us through each step in a gracious way that made the entire process a breeze from the initial viewings of available homes to the closing and signing of all the paperwork. That said, it was all time consuming, which meant I got a late start in the garden. Prior to buying the house, I didn’t have a place to start seeds so I direct seeded everything in the raised beds. Some of the seeds actually germinated and did relatively well. Others, didn’t germinate at all. Once the house was purchased, moving in, getting settled, and painting projects further limited the time I had to spend gardening.

I also started having frequent back spasms beginning in the spring and carrying on throughout the summer. At our community gardens, we do not have a well or a water line to hook up a hose. Instead we have three 300 gallon tanks that get filled from a hose line running from one of the other plot holders and the organization pays the owner for the water. Each plot holder then fills up water cans and waters their plot or plots by hand. With 800 square feet to hand water it took over an hour just to splash everything with a little water. Watering effectively would have taken closer to two hours or longer. I quickly learned that my back was simply not up to that much lifting and carrying. After every watering session my back rebelled against me by going into spasm again which would take several days to recover from. I once read a Gene Logsdon book in which he recounted that a local Amish farmer told him that he would only farm as much land as he could farm well. This growing season I learned that 800 square feet of hand watered garden was more than I could garden well. Next season, I’ll drop that in half and that size will hopefully be more manageable and therefore better managed. It may turn out that I get more food as a result!

Having said all of that, I want to iterate an important point, which is that even gardening poorly can yield an abundance of food. I harvested many pounds of winter squash that are now in my basement to be eaten this fall and winter. There are still more to get from the garden as I write this. We got all of our summer squash and most of the tomatoes and peppers that we ate this summer all from our garden. I also harvested a modest amount of potatoes, cucumbers, and turnips along with a steady supply of various leafy greens. All of this abundance of organic vegetable yumminess grew despite the incredibly “hands-off” approach that I had to take in the garden this season and the lack of adequate water in weeks without any rain. So next year, take the plunge and grow some of your own food because doing so is one of the most important things we can do in an age of post peak oil. We can all participate in the transition to a more sustainable agricultural model, starting in our own yards or in local community gardens.

One harvest from the year of gardening poorly.

One harvest from the year of gardening poorly.

Ode to Joy

Copyrighted by Creative Commons. User permission required.

The Summer Concert series of free concerts put on at Long’s Park is one of the cultural offerings that makes Lancaster, PA special. In addition to having a unique bioregional culture influenced by the Anabaptist sects, the rich fertile soil and the mighty Susquehanna River, the area also has many ways to celebrate the uniqueness of being human as expressed by artist both local and from far flung places. From First Friday art walks downtown, to Music Fridays on the third Friday of the month, to the glorious Fulton Opera House, the Ware Center, and Franklin and Marshall College people from our small city have abundant opportunities to enjoy the arts. Art enriches our lives in myriad ways and makes them much more interesting. Enjoying these types of events is a great way to truly connect to the bioregions in which we live. It is a fantastic way to cultivate a sense of place and when we do that, we learn to love and protect our life places.

Music is one of the most powerful expressions of human culture.  Listening to music can move us in deep and profound ways. Sometimes it gives us chills such is the powerful effect of the notes and lyrics. Sometimes it can elicit sheer unadulterated joy. Such was the case last night as I went to see March Fourth! Marching Band at Long’s Park thanks to my friend Jena who is a huge fan of the band.  Unlike anything I’ve ever experienced, March Fourth!  puts the super-cool into marching band and plays their music with volume, skill, and a tremendous amount of gusto. It was a joy to behold for the eyes and the ears.The vibrancy of the costumes, the acrobats and dancers, and the skillful musicianship all made the night one to remember.

Enjoy the pics and if you get a chance to see March Fourth! live then by all means go.

The crowd eagerly awaiting the band.

The crowd eagerly awaiting the band.

Unique costumes add to the joy.

Unique costumes add to the joy.

Bringing the jams.

Bringing the jams.

Sequins and saxaphones

Sequins and saxaphones

Shakin' thngs up.

Shakin’ thngs up.

Tutankhaman on the flute.

Tutankhaman on the flute.

I could do that if I wanted to...go to the hospital

I could do that if I wanted to…go to the hospital

JOY!

JOY!

Joy part deux!

Joy part deux!

The splits.

The splits.

Oh my neck...

Oh my neck…

Put your hands in the air.

Put your hands in the air.

Making trombone cool.

Making trombone cool.

 

The permaculture seminarian fundraiser

Please consider buying a photo to help me raise funds for seminary.

Creation Care, Neighbor Care, Future Care- The world through a permaculture lens

Copyrighted by Creative Commons. User permission required. Copyrighted by Creative Commons. User permission required.

Beginning in August, I will be a student at the Lancaster Theological Seminary, here in Lancaster, PA. It wasn’t that long ago that such a notion would have seemed absurd to me but now it makes perfect sense. I am a spiritual person and spent my formative years (from 12-18) in the Bible belt, in the rural north Texas town of Blue Ridge. The messages that I learned from church in those days instilled in me a desire to follow the Golden Rule as well as to be a good Christian. These days,  I still have that desire to follow the Golden Rule, and see it has dovetailing seamlessly with the ethics of Permaculture, which to me are Creation Care, Neighbor Care, and Future Care. I also have the desire to “unlearn” many of the things I learned from well meaning pastors and…

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The permaculture seminarian fundraiser

Copyrighted by Creative Commons. User permission required.

Copyrighted by Creative Commons. User permission required.

Beginning in August, I will be a student at the Lancaster Theological Seminary, here in Lancaster, PA. It wasn’t that long ago that such a notion would have seemed absurd to me but now it makes perfect sense. I am a spiritual person and spent my formative years (from 12-18) in the Bible belt, in the rural north Texas town of Blue Ridge. The messages that I learned from church in those days instilled in me a desire to follow the Golden Rule as well as to be a good Christian. These days,  I still have that desire to follow the Golden Rule, and see it has dovetailing seamlessly with the ethics of Permaculture, which to me are Creation Care, Neighbor Care, and Future Care. I also have the desire to “unlearn” many of the things I learned from well meaning pastors and to explore more deeply the historical, sociological, anthropological, metaphorical and ecological underpinnings of the Christian New Testament and the Hebrew bible and how this deeper understanding of scripture can be applied today in this world gone made on war and environmental destruction.

One of the ways I am hoping to finance this expensive and exciting educational undertaking is through my photography. While in seminary a traditional job simply is not possible for me but photography and also writing afford me the chance to earn some income in moments when I am not buried in books about first century Palestine or the Jewish diaspora. To that end I want to promote the sites where my photography can be seen and even better my work can be purchased. The purpose is two-fold, one I hope to increase my exposure as a freelance photographer and two, I want to earn some money to offset the $60,000 in loans that will be required to complete a Master of Divinity degree.

Those wishing to buy photos or a variety of items such as mugs or wall art can go to my personal website on the Lancaster Photo Collective website at the following link: http://www.lancasterphotocollective.com/Dillon-Naber-Cruz-Photography

I have a growing portfolio on the stock photography website Shutterstock.com. Photographers interested in getting their work published can help my seminary cause by signing up to be a contributor to Shutterstock at this link: Contribute to Shutterstock

Those interested in using stock photography from Shutterstock can use this link: Shutterstock customer link

If anyone thinks that theological education is super important and wants to lend a hand without buying a picture then this is the link for you:

http://paypal.me/DillonCruz

Here are a few recent shots to whet the appetite.

Reflections in the glass

Reflections in the glass

An Amish hay wagon

An Amish hay wagon

Lancaster County

Lancaster County

Cowsheds waterfall Moravia, New York

Cowsheds waterfall Moravia, New York

 

Pride: In the name of LOVE…

In the name of Love

In the name of Love

In the early 1990s I was indoctrinated, the only other appropriate word would be brainwashed, into fearing and discriminating against those who were born homosexual. It was a time of “Don’t ask, don’t tell” in the military and I was in the Marines. I was also a member of a Southern Baptist Church in Honolulu at the time and it was there that I learned all about the “Gay Agenda” and how it was perfidiously undermining America, the nuclear family and society in general. I wish I could say that I saw right through the hate filled invective that spewed forth from the pastor’s mouth, the videos we were shown, and the story of the guest speaker who claimed to have repented from the “sin” of promiscuous homosexuality. Alas, I cannot truthfully make that claim for my 20 something year old self. I was told, along with the rest of the congregation, that the North American Man Boy Love Association was a typical, mainstream group in the gay community, i.e. that gay men are essentially pedophiles, and that the bathhouse scene of wanton, promiscuous sex was also the norm for gay men. Of course both of those things were outrageously false then as now but I fell for it basically hook, line and sinker and became an ignorant, homophobic young man who ran around wearing a custom made ball cap that said, “I Support Gun Rights and Gay Control” because I thought it was clever. It wasn’t. It was bigotry pure and simple.

I do not recall precisely when that view point began to unravel for me. The only explanation I have is that I am the beneficiary of some truly amazing grace in this and other areas of life and thought. As my collegiate studies progressed and I learned to think more critically about the things I had learned in my life while growing up in rural Texas and as an evangelical Christian Marine, the more views that were based upon ignorance, fear, or some sort of racial superiority complex began to come apart at the seams. I could no longer believe in the American fundamentalist version of Christianity, the notion of “American Exceptionalism” and its inherent militarism and xenophobia, nor could I believe that the LGBTQ community was going to precipitate the downfall of humanity due to its godless sinfulness. Later I learned, or finally allowed myself to understand that I am not “exclusively heterosexual” as described by the Kinsey Scale. I’d say that I would be determined to be a 1 or 2 on the scale which makes me predominately heterosexual but with “incidental” or perhaps”more than incidental” homosexual desires. On a scale of 1-100% I’d place myself as 90-95% heterosexual and 5-10% bisexual and I now understand that this simply describes how I was born as a sexual human being.

 

Student pastor Joao and Douglas

Student pastor John and Douglas from Wisdom’s Table United Church of Christ

The recent tragedy in Orlando, FL at the Pulse nightclub underscores painfully the ignorance that still exists in America and the world regarding homosexuality due in part to poor understandings of scripture, people’s inner conflict with being gay or having a gay loved one, toxic masculinity, and lack of education about the LGBTQ community. I am hopeful that my story, and the stories of others who have moved from abhorrence based upon ignorance to complete, loving acceptance of our gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender, or questioning neighbors will inspire others to become radically welcoming to the LGBTQ community and love them for who they are. To do anything other than accepting people for who they are often leads to hatefulness, bigotry and in extreme instances, violence. Imagine feeling extremely vulnerable whenever you are in public or literally being hated simply for being who you are…

Hooray for rainbow families.

Hooray for rainbow families.

I’m a white male in a heterosexual marriage and I have a university degree, all of which indicates a certain level of privilege. This privilege insulates me from a great number of things that people of color, LGBTQ, or in those in low income areas have to deal with routinely.  In order to understand, if even a tiny way, what it might feel like to be vulnerable like that and to show solidarity with my LGBTQ friends and neighbors, I decided to wear a skirt to church yesterday and then to the Lancaster Pride Fest afterwards where I would be working at the church’s booth for a couple of hours. It didn’t take long for the anxiety that I experience due to PTSD to kick in and the self talk to become a negotiation with myself about showing solidarity in a less “envelope pushing” or “safer” way. My heart started to pound before I even left our house and I began to sweat much more than usual. In the end, I stopped negotiating with myself, took a deep breath and headed out the door. Walking down the street by myself in our new neighborhood (we recently bought a small house in Lancaster, PA) wearing a long, bright red skirt, rainbow suspenders, and a blue “seek peace” t-shirt , felt like one of the bravest things I’ve done in quite a long time. There was no way for me to be inconspicuous. I’m 6’2″ tall, weigh about 180 pounds with long hair and fairly unruly beard. In other words, I stuck out like a sore thumb.

Pride and Joy

Pride and Joy

The walk from church to the Pride Fest was equally nerve wracking. Every time a person drove past me or walked by, I braced myself for some nasty comment or snide remark. To add to my consternation, I needed some cash for the event and had to stop at two different places to find an ATM. After getting some cash,  I got myself an organic iced tea and then went to stand in line at in the CVS to pay for it. The guy in front of me gave me a sidelong glance and I detected a mildly derisive look but nothing further happened. I walked the last few blocks to the event without incident and once I was there, I no longer stood out so much, nor did I feel threatened in any way. I had literally walked a mile (actually a bit more than a mile) in someone else’s shoes and it was scary, which was illuminating in more ways than one. On the lighter side, I know now that skirts are SUPER comfy in hot weather… I hope my decision to don a skirt and step out of my comfort zone will help me to be more consistently loving, more compassionate, and to more fully embody the ethic of “neighbor care” and “The Golden Rule” as I continue on my journey in life.  I also  pray that it will inspire others to do likewise.

Painting Prayer Flags at the Wisdom's Table UCC booth.

Painting Prayer Flags at the Wisdom’s Table UCC booth.

In the event that any evangelical Christian people chance upon this blog, I say, “Grace and the Peace of Christ be with you”. If by chance anyone wants to say that I am cavorting with “sinners” by having friends in the LGBTQ community and by attending an open, affirming church, then I’ll politely say in advance that I fundamentally disagree with the notion that God created people who are gay and then said, “Sucks to be you. You’re gay, I made you that way, BUT it’s a sin, so good luck with that.” Even if it were a sin (which again, I think is absolute nonsense) I would remind my Christian neighbors that Jesus hung out with so called “sinners” ALL THE TIME and he just loved them rather than condemning them. He offered them grace and saved his condemnation for systems of oppression and sacrifice. We are called to love as Jesus has loved for God is love. And here’s the kicker, “Love keeps no record of wrongs”.  So if God is love and therefore keeps no record of wrongs, why do we insist upon keeping such lengthy, detailed records of everyone else’s “wrongs”? I’d say we’ve had it backwards for far too long…

Diversity is beautiful.

Diversity is beautiful.

We are also called to stop judging one another and to look deeply at ourselves, make ourselves perfect first, which is a rather difficult undertaking, and only then can we legitimately call others out on their “sin” if we choose to ignore grace. I would also like to to remind anyone using God to bash gays, that Jesus said not a single word that we know of about homosexuality despite the fact that it was common in the ancient world. Perhaps this is because there was never meant to be a blanket prohibition of homosexuality at all, as a rabbi once told my dear friend Ben Weiss. Or perhaps it is because the ancient manuscripts do not actually speak of homosexuality but rather denounce all coercive, forced sex, including that which takes place between men and boys, which of course is an entirely different thing. We must remember that Jesus flipped so much of the Old Testament on its head by saying things like, “You have heard it said, but I say to you…”

A couple applying temporary rainbow tattoos.

A couple applying temporary rainbow tattoos at the Wisdom’s Table booth

I’ll leave you with my own modern retelling of the parable of the Good Samaritan:

A certain man, holding hatred in his heart against gay people, while walking home was stabbed in an alley and then robbed. The man moaned loudly as a bishop was going past. The bishop not wanting to stain his robes, crossed the road, muttering a little prayer for the wounded man. Soon a Southern Baptist preacher, in suit and tie, saw the stricken man and quickly turned away, looked at his watch and hurried past. Moments later, an impeccably well dressed and groomed black man, whose name was Nathan walked towards the alley where the wounded man lay. He was talking on his cell phone to his husband, and the wounded man heard him say,  “I love you too Gary and I’ll be home soon.” Upon hanging up, Nathan saw the wounded man,  let out an exclamation of alarm and then ran towards him. He removed his tailored jacket and placed it under the wounded man’s head and then pulled off his expensive shirt to staunch the flow of blood from the knife wound. Nathan then called for an ambulance and waited for its arrival while doing everything he could to keep the man in severe pain calm, holding his hand and speaking softly to him as the minutes passed. He rode to the hospital in the ambulance and once there insisted upon paying for the victim’s medical treatment and all his living expenses while the victim recovered.

Which one of these people was most like Jesus? Who do you want to emulate?

More scenes from Lancaster Pride:

 

Embracing the skirt

Embracing the skirt

My artistic wife painting her flag.

My artistic wife painting her flag.

Music minister and friend Douglas and my wife Christina spreading joy.

Music minister and friend Douglas and my wife Christina spreading joy.

Pride pup

Pride pup

I loved her sign. Her smile is radiant.

I loved her sign. Her smile is radiant.

Pride. 'nuff said.

Pride. ’nuff said.

My wife spreading joy through dance

My wife spreading joy through dance

Christina and our talented friend Michelle embracing at Pride.

Christina and our talented friend Michelle embracing at Pride.

My good friend Jennifer trying hard not to be cute.

My good friend Jennifer trying hard not to be cute.

Loud and proud.

Loud and proud.

Members of the band Fierce. Lancaster, PA

Members of the band Fierce. Lancaster, PA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wisdom’s Table UCC Lancaster

 

The Christian Call to Earth Stewardship

Slight edits made 5/31/2016

Creation Care, Neighbor Care, Future Care- The world through a permaculture lens

His eyes are on the sparrow and I know he watches me. His eyes are on the sparrow and I know he watches me.

In the Biblical story of the Earth’s creation, we are told that God created it and all of its inhabitants, proclaiming each and every aspect of this creation to be “Good.” To my mind this would make God the ultimate biological systems engineer. Each and everything on the planet has a role, a niche to fill to keep the planet’s systems functioning well. LIFE! A profusion of life was God’s goal in creating this place we call Earth and humanity’s role on Earth was and IS to maintain that life and those systems masterminded by God to perpetuate it. It is my belief that Earth stewardship is an integral part of walking the Christian path because to take care of the Earth is to ensure we take care of our neighbors. In this modern, globalized age, every person…

View original post 1,425 more words

New photography website

After receiving positive feedback for my photos, I decided to set up a website so that people can purchase prints and other items with my photos on them. Perhaps that way I can go get those new lenses I have been dreaming of. I’ve now also got a Shutterstock.com portfolio.

Check out the new site. I am excited to be collaborating with another incredibly talented photographer.  Additional photos are being added on an almost daily basis.

Cruz Control Photography by Dillon Naber Cruz

Dillon Naber Cruz Shutterstock

Available on my site

Available on my site

 

 

 

The beginning of the end for RoundUp?

RoundUp is the most used herbicide in the world today and it is well known to be toxic. Glyphosate is one of the key ingredients in the herbicide and its copycat herbicides from other chemical companies.  The California EPA announced today that it intends to label glyphosate as cancer causing. This news is HUGE. California is the world’s 5th largest economy.  Once California does this, other places will surely follow suit. Most  GMO crops are modified to withstand being sprayed with RoiundUp, creating a toxic product that is marketed as safe, nutritious food. Surely, biotech companies no longer have a leg to stand on when it comes to producing this chemical or crops modified to withstand spraying with a glyphosate based herbicide.

A full ban must be instituted immediately and producers must pay to reverse the damage their products have done to the ecology of the planet.

California to label RoundUp

CA EPA Announcement

 

Where would Jesus frack?

Industry execs loathe regulations that aim to protect natural capital and make it harder for industries to cut corners in order to increase profits.  These same companies intentionally obfuscate the worst of their crimes against humanity with falsified documents or bogus research as has been shown numerous times by chemical companies, oil and gas conglomerates or the tobacco industry.  We see it today as biotech giants like Monsanto, Bayer and Syngenta fight law suits and engage in buying politicians (how else can we explain Congress voting to ban GMO labeling?).  The fracking industry now finds itself trying to maintain its ill gotten profits as research turns up ever more evidence that the practice is destructive to watersheds and drinking water.  When will a critical mass of concerned citizens arise to shut down the well pads? When will Christian America stand up and demand that God’s creation be responsibly stewarded and stand up for the Golden Rule so that people are not poisoned in the name of greed? When will politicians actually listen and LEAD from the front rather than being bought in a back room deal?

Responsible regulation would ensure that natural capital is of paramount importance. If a company can not 100% guarantee the safety of a watershed before, during, and after an industrial process, whether it is extractive, manufacturing, or application of  product, then the process MUST BE IMMEDIATELY BANNED.  Companies know that paying for the natural capital resources that are used in industry would make prevent them from making a profit as is evidenced by the last few paragraphs of the linked article and by recent studies proving that no industry would make a profit if natural capital was considered in the accounting.

We’re running out of time for meaningful action. The biosphere (the layer of the planet that contains life) can only handle so much.

Radioactive creek

For further evidence of corporate malfeasance:

DuPont poisons the world

Natural capital

On elks and fracking

This work is copyrighted by Creative Commons. Permission must be obtained from the author to re-post or use any pictures or words from this work.

Recently I learned through the magic of the internet that there is a sizable herd of wild elk in northern Pennsylvania in the aptly named Elk County. Upon gaining this knowledge, I was immediately gripped by a desire to see these magnificent creatures and to photograph them. It was well worth the trip, though in the past, a journey of such length would hardly have been necessary to see animals such as elk in Pennsylvania as they roamed throughout the state. Greed, that root of all that is evil, brought about the extirpation or extinction of many species that lived in what is now the Eastern United States, elk amongst them. Because history is so little valued in this country and is often distorted for nationalist, narrow minded reasons we are now continuing the sad tradition of spending our natural capital for profit and are in the midst of a mass extinction event. Rather than learn about important societal issues like land use, conservation, labor rights, and other social history we’re taught about rich people, politicians, and wars fought to advance the interests of rich people and as a result as a society we are repeating the mistakes of the past.

Elk habitat was lost due to clear cutting the old growth forests in Pennsylvania and other habitat disturbances such as coal mining. Exacerbating this habitat loss was over hunting to satisfy the appetites of wealthy people in large cities who ate elk in fancy restaurants.  Elk disappeared from Pennsylvania the way the eastern buffalo herd did, the beaver, the passenger pigeon and who knows what else. The herd that is now roaming the Allegheny Mountains near Benezette, PA has grown from 50 animals brought in from Colorado in the early 20th century. Habitat has been reclaimed and nurtured on land once strip mined for coal. This success however belies the perfidious activities of extractive industries currently doing their best to make large swaths of Pennsylvania uninhabitable for elk and perhaps human beings as fracking continues unabated despite knowledge that hydraulic fracturing uses enormous amounts of water and then poisons it with toxic chemicals as has been shown in Bradford County, PA.

Another lesson unlearned from history is what happens when the boom times end. Chesapeake Energy, and other companies of their ilk practice a type of neo-colonialism by coming in making promises of prosperity for all while really only serving themselves. Most of the jobs go to people from out of the state as do most of the profits. Meanwhile politicians sit idly by doing nothing but kow-towing to industry execs proclaiming that the rape of the Earth is good for the economy while smiling smarmy smiles and laughing all the way to the bank. Chesapeake Energy literally buys the goodwill of locals by giving token amounts of money to local environmental causes such as the Keystone Elk Country Alliance. Yet as soon as their profits dwindle these companies will leave without a thought for the horrific ecological and economic mess they leave behind with natural capital spent and unaccounted for in their business accounting. Residents are then left to pick up the pieces in economically depressed towns and cities while the companies look elsewhere for people, places, and ecosystems to exploit. Rinse, lather, repeat.

If people (including corporate executives) could see past short term dollar signs our rivers would be clean and teeming with aquatic life, our forests filled with old growth trees, groundwater suitable for drinking or irrigation, and soil thriving rather than inert chemical laced dirt. In short, natural capital would invariably trump the fiction that is monetary capital.  How long will the Pennsylvania Wilds be wild? How long will these elk last? How long will the trout streams remain clean enough for trout as fracking chemicals continue to pollute? How long will citizens sit on their hands or just shake their heads proclaiming “that’s the price of progress?” If destroying the systems that promote life is progress, then I say, “Fuck progress.”

One of the reasons I enjoy taking and sharing photographs is because I want to inspire people to connect with the natural world and work to protect, conserve, and treasure it.  Observe, interact, and ACT! One home is all we have. One home is all the elk have.

 

Elk silliness.

Elk silliness.

Aum...

Aum…

Wapiti, an Indian name for elk, means white butt.

Wapiti, an Indian name for elk, means white butt.

slurp

Slurp!

Raspberry...

Raspberry…

Alert.

Alert.

Whatchoo lookin' at?

Whatchoo lookin’ at?

Momma turkey

Momma turkey

munch7

Meditative elk.

Meditative elk.

Wild turkey poults roosting.

Wild turkey poults roosting.

Salad bar for the Elk set.

Salad bar for the Elk set.

friends2

Spooked in the fog.

Spooked in the fog.

Ethel1

Morning fog for momma and baby.

Morning fog for momma and baby.

Early dinner.

Early dinner.

Elk buddies.

Elk buddies.

Yearling bull elk

Yearling bull elk

 

 

Yummy grass.

Yummy grass.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Elk Alliance truck donated by Chesapeake Energy.

Elk Alliance truck donated by Chesapeake Energy.

Copyrighted by Creative Commons.

Copyrighted by Creative Commons.